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Dreaming of Death


Recently I was talking with my daughters mother ĎRí, and she told me she had just had a dream and in the dream a woman who was an acquaintance of hers was there. The woman wasnít a close friend and R hadnít seen her for some time.

She said the woman was serene and smiling and she sensed she was dead. (In the physical sense)

After hearing this I responded, ďAnd is she?Ē R didnít know, but after having the dream she had called the woman and there was no answer, and until then she hadnít heard back from her.

A few days after our conversation R emailed me to say she had heard from the womanís husband who had told her his wife had indeed recently passed away.

This is not the first time R has told me about dreams involving someone who later died so I wasnít surprised, but as always when these events happen it reminded me that if these things happen, and I believe they do, then everything I learned at school about the brain generating all of our thoughts and actions cannot be correct.

A year or so ago, I had a dream that I bothered to write down as soon as I woke up. In the dream I was in a place where everyone was dressed in white.  My grandfather was there (my mothers father) and there were other people on his level, meaning other family members ó three lots of grandparents (I grew up with my stepfather and I never met my biological fatherís parents) and other relatives who I didnít know, represented by my grandfather who I did know.

They were waiting for ‘someone’ to arrive.  The person they were waiting for was mentally impaired in some way, but when he/she arrived (in the dream I didnít know who) he/she was fine and all the mental afflictions had gone.

When I woke up I Ďknewí that someone had died, and they were connected to my grandparents but that was all I knew. A few hours later, my son rang me to say he had just had a call from my cousin to say her mother (my aunty V) had died during the night.

I didnít know this particular aunt, I hadnít seen her since I was around three years old, and I had no idea what she looked like, nor did I know she was close to death. What I did know was, that she had suffered with Alzheimerís disease for many years and had been in a care home since my uncle (her husband) had died a few years ago.

Once I received the call the dream made sense. I took it to mean a group of people (discarnateís) who are related to me but who I didnít know, were waiting for aunty V, and that once she arrived, she was no longer plagued by the mental disease that had dogged her for more than thirty years, and my grandfather was shown to me so I might understand the dream was relevant and was more than just a jumble of thoughts. 

Had I had this dream a day or a month later, it would have meant nothing, but on this particular day it meant a lot.

A few years ago, my partner T, was talking to her younger sister P. P told her about a dream she had recently had where Pís husband, P.M., appeared to be dead, and in the dream his face was decomposed. At the time P and P.M. were a young couple living in Zurich; she was in her 20ís and he in his 30ís.

A year or so later, their marriage wasnít going so well and one day after a particularly bad argument, P left P.M.. and went to stay with a friend for a while. During that time she didnít make contact with P.M. and he didnít contact her.


After a couple of weeks P went back to their apartment and found P.M. dead in bed. According the coroner, P.M. had probably been dead for around 2 weeks ó he had died from an overdose of alcohol and drugs, and by the time he was found, his body had begun to decompose.

Three events, all close to home, and all too specific to be a coincidence in my humble opinionÖ

What does it all mean?

Albert Einstein wrote in a letter after his friend Besso passed away; although Besso had preceded him in death it was of no consequence, “...for us physicists believe the separation between past, present, and future is only an illusion, although a convincing one.”

So if I saw Aunty V arriving somewhere at the same time she physically died (clairvoyance) and if Rís acquaintance came to her to let her know she had died, (retrocognition) and if P did foresee J. P.ís death a year in advance, (precognition) could it mean there is no time and that what we think of as time is just an illusion?

Clairvoyance, (to perceive things or events beyond normal sensory contact), Precognition, (the ability to foresee events beyond normal sensory contact), and Retro cognition, )to see or sense things or events in the past beyond normal sensory contact), are seemingly impossible things, that although denied by reductionist science, regularly happen to people all around the world.

Was Meister Eckhart was right when he said; “There exists only the present instant ... There is no yesterday nor any tomorrow, but only Now ... “

Buddhist teacher Sheng Yen explains in his book Complete Enlightenment, “The life of a sentient being is a long dream. Existence only appears to be real. When one finally awakens, or attains Buddhahood, existence is seen for what it is—a sequence of illusions. Until that time, people will remain obsessed by the body, mind, and external phenomena, not realizing that they are illusory. You will live in a dream, thinking that it is reality.Ē

It appears that time may indeed be an illusion. A crude analogy might be; we are starring in our own movie, and we are at liberty to change the script as we go, (free will) and if one is sensitive enough, (as a clairvoyant is) one is able to step outside of the movie and look in. Some of us we are able to communicate with the watchers of Ďourí movie whoever they might be?  óOur higher selves and other interested parties perhaps?

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